Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 16 – 23, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #recycling #environment #covid19 #pandemic

Atlantic Hurricane Epsilon shortly after reaching Category 3 status on 21 October 2020

After many weeks of extraordinary activity, the tropical Atlantic is considerably quiet as the hurricane season slowly winds down. The lone exception is Hurricane Epsilon which reached major hurricane status on 21 October 2020 as a late season Atlantic tropical cyclone. 2020 will go in the record books as a very extraordinary year. Wildfires and drought continue to plague much of North America with no immediate relief in sight. There are many other good stories to cover this week including a successful spacecraft mission to and asteroid, so lets get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

2020 continues to be on track as a record year for the Atlantic hurricane season. Fortunately, the official end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is coming soon. Regardless, it’s important to not let your guard down. Late season tropical storms and hurricanes can occur and catch people off guard who think the danger is over for the year. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For May 22 – 29, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #climate #climatechange #environment #recycling #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is faring well in this midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be an obstacle in dealing with the pandemic and finding a long-term path of adaptation. The North American spring severe weather season is peaking and the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season is just days away. Well take a look at some severe weather safety information and much more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

The criteria for a severe thunderstorm is understandably very strict. Frequent lightning and torrential downpours do not make for a severe thunderstorm. The main basis is sensibly put on straight line winds, hail, and/or a history of producing tornadoes.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Knowing where to get reliable, accurate, and timely weather information can be a daunting task, especially for folks who are new to a region that may be prone to a hurricane risk, winter storms, or episodes of severe weather (large hail, damaging straight line winds, and tornadoes). This infographic from NOAA’s National Weather Service will help you through the murky haze of misinformation and hype and is valid year round for every kind of weather situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright Tornado Quest 1998-2020

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For June 1 – 8, 2019

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active week across much of North America with flooding, severe weather, and summer heat affecting many areas. May 2019 will go in the record books for tornado activity and flooding across several states. The beginning of June also brings the start of the Atlantic hurricane season. There are plenty of other topics to cover and severe weather preparedness tips, so let’s get started.

  1. May 2019 will go in the weather history books as a record month for tornado activity across the USA. Here’s a detailed look back with a plethora of fascinating data.
  2. Ongoing floods in the USA’s Great Plains are not just affecting homeowners. “Midwest farmers take to Twitter to document flood disaster.”
  3. As floods have devastated the Great Plains, heat waves have been taking place in much of the southeastern USA. This is one of many clear signals of how important urgent climate action is. Since the 1960s, U.S. cities have experienced more frequent and longer periods of extreme heat…and the death toll from this heat has been rising.
  4. The official beginning of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season commenced on June 1st. Let’s revisit this years Atlantic hurricane outlook from NOAA.
  5. With the arrival of the Atlantic hurricane season, here’s a primer on hurricane preparedness from NOAA with several links to other information sources.
  6. Microplastic have proven to be problematic world-wide and have been discovered in some very remote areas. Some say it’s time for producers of this particular type of plastic pollution to be held accountable.
  7. Recycling is an exceptionally important part of taking care of our planet. Often it can be a confusing task. As it becomes more of a widespread practice, some folks are developing ways to make it easier for you and me.
  8. Communication style is key in coming to a consensus or when conversing with skeptics. As many of us know, conversation with a climate change skeptic/denialist is often like talking to a brick wall. So how do you talk with such a person?
  9. Speaking of climate change denialism, this story has given them plenty of fodder to get their dander up in recent days. But is there any validation to the headline?
  10. The usual trend seen in observing the universe is to note how galaxies are expanding and moving away from our own Milky Way galaxy. Here’s an interesting read on one galaxy that’s moving towards us.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

Testing your NOAA weather radio year round is one of the best ways to stay informed on weather conditions for your area regardless of the season. Many National Weather Service offices conduct weekly tests. It’s also a good idea to replace the batteries in your NOAA weather radio when you change batteries in your smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, Texas
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued and you are in the warned area, there are good options and bad options for taking shelter. The choice can sometimes be a life-and-death decision. Bad options have killed countless people in recent years. One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very sincere “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, your loyalty is deeply appreciated. Thanks so much for the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For April 20 – 27, 2019

Greetings to everyone! I hope that the spring, or autumn, weather that you’re having is to your liking. Here in North America, we’ve had quite an active April with bouts of winter weather mixed with severe weather episodes. The peak of severe thunderstorm and tornado activity is on our doorstep, so I’ve included a comprehensive list of infographics and links to help you stay prepared and informed. As usual, there are many other topics that made big news this week, so let’s get started.

  1. In spite of any negative press as of late regarding recycling, it’s never a waste of time and has long-term benefits.
  2. The USA has made great strides in air quality in recent decades. In spite of that, we have a long, long way to go. If our current air quality issues are ignored at the expense of our children, we’ll have a public health crisis on our hands of major proportions.
  3. Are we doing enough to fight climate change? The best answer to that is to do as much as you can.
  4. The financial aspects of climate change are the proverbial elephant in the room. “Climate “Tipping Points” Could Add Trillions to the Costs of Warming.”
  5. Mental health issues, including PTSD, are quite common after natural disasters. This story takes a look at residents of the USA’s Virgin Islands and their mental health struggles after two major hurricanes ravaged the region.
  6. Coastal flooding, beach erosion, and effects on sea level ice are important factors in this read. “Extremely fast winds and high waves are now happening more often.”
  7. In case you missed it, here’s an excellent essay by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on the problematic challenge of people depending on tornado warning sirens. If you think that sirens will save your life, think again.
  8. The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) in Norman, Oklahoma is like no other weather forecasting office in the world. With state of the art technology and some of the top-notch atmospheric scientists on staff, they do an astoundingly accurate job of forecasting severe weather and issuing the appropriate watches. Here’s an excellent “behind-the-scenes” look at the SPC that few people ever get to see.
  9. Speaking of the Storm Prediction Center, here’s a fascinating read from U.S. Tornadoes on a detailed examination of a decade worth of tornado occurrence patterns.
  10. Last but not least, here’s a look at the Oklahoma Mesonet on it’s 25th birthday. No where else on earth does such a inimitable weather network exist.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

Testing your NOAA weather year round is one of the best ways to stay informed on weather conditions for your area regardless of the season. Many National Weather Service offices conduct weekly tests. It’s also a good idea to replace the batteries in your NOAA weather radio when you change batteries in your smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS/SPC

When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo Texas

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued and you are in the warned area, there are good options and bad options for taking shelter. The choice can sometimes be a life-and-death decision. Bad options have killed countless people in recent years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very warm “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, here’s a sincere “Thank You!” I appreciate all of the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For March 30 – April 6, 2019

Greetings to one and all! Here in North America, the severe weather season is well underway and there have been several very active days so far…and we’ve many, many weeks of potentially volatile activity. There are plenty of other topics to cover as well as severe weather preparedness links…so let’s get started.

  1. One of the most crucial environmental challenges that we face is the recycling dilemma. With China now refusing to take much of the world’s recyclable materials, it’s up to other countries to step up and take the lead.
  2. Copenhagen has just raised the bar when it comes to embracing sustainability.
  3. The much touted “Green New Deal” may be well intended may have good intentions, but it’s based on politics rather than science. As is always the case when ideology takes center stage, there are hidden agendas.
  4. While this air pollution research is based on data in Asia, it is applicable to cities worldwide…and your children.
  5. Toxic pollution knows no borders. This is clearly demonstrated in how Canadian coal mines send pollution into the United States.
  6. Understanding the link between history and climate is crucial to having a comprehensive knowledge of how societies…past and present…have been affected in economic and social behaviors.
  7. Whether or not this concept will come to fruition is a matter of great speculation. “This Self-Sustaining Hurricane-Proof City Could Be Just What The World Needs.”
  8. Here’s a very, very early look at speculative forecasts for the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season. It’s important to remember than there are many variables involved and this essay, while interesting, is exceptionally preliminary.
  9. The Polar Vortex played plenty of tricks up its sleeve in the winter just past. Some USA cities saw temperature swings during January and February of up to 70 degrees.
  10. This is an excellent essay by Dr. Marshall Shepherd that addresses a topic that needs to be fully attended to. “How Meteorologists Compare To Other Professions That Predict The Future.”

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Many thunderstorms that are a part of the severe weather season may seem “severe” but there is actually a strict criteria that a thunderstorm must meet before being classified as “severe.” For the most part, severe criteria is a matter of hail, high winds, and tornadoes. Frequent lightning or heavy downpours does not make for a severe thunderstorm.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Here are some links that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climates on our planet.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesty American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very warm “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, here’s a sincere “Thank You!” I appreciate all of the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For March 16 – 23, 2019

Greetings to one and all. This has been a very eventful week across a vast area of our planet. Cyclone Idai has devastated a significant part of southern Africa with almost 1,5 million people affected and a death toll that will no doubt be rising for some time. The humanitarian crisis is beyond description. Meanwhile, the central plains USA has been under the wrath of unprecedented flooding that may go on for weeks. The severe weather season has gotten off to a robust start across much of the USA. The infographic below shows how your mobile device can be crucial to you getting severe weather watch and warning information.

There are plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

  1. Before NASA’s Mars Opportunity Rover said it’s final goodbye, it captured some spectacular images that have to be seen to be believed.
  2. For my fellow dinosaur lovers, an intriguing read. “There are More Dinosaurs to Discover from the Time of T. rex
  3. Recycling is an exceptionally important part of improving the health of our environment and reducing waste. Recently, China’s decision to no longer take a vast amount of recyclables is causing ramifications from Australia to the USA.
  4. There’s an irrevocable link between air quality and public health. In spite of progress made in recent decades, air pollution remains a significant health hazard. While this article focuses some on the UK, it is applicable the world over. “Deadly Air In Our Cities: The Invisible Killer.”
  5. This is a clear cut of ‘cutting off your nose to spite your face.’ To remove science from clean air standards is inhumanely irresponsible.
  6. While variations in severe weather activity vary in the USA from year to year, this interesting map from NOAA can show your monthly risk of severe weather. Move the slider button at the bottom of the map to highlight the climatological activity of severe weather occurrence. It’s also helpful to keep in mind that severe weather, including tornadoes, has occurred in many regions during all seasons…including winter.
  7. This spring 2019 outlook from NOAA has an ominous note…the possibility of further flooding in the USA could continue into May.
  8. As of 21 March 2019, the staggering humanitarian crisis in Africa in the wake of Cyclone Idai is getting worse by the day. In the USA, the central Midwestern states are dealing with record setting flooding with billions of dollars in damage. Both of these stories are still developing and updates are
  9. One of the most tragic elements of any severe weather event are fatalities and injuries that could have been avoided if warnings and forecasts had been heeded by the general public. The common refrain is, “We had no warning.” or “We’ve never seen anything like this before.” The social science dimension is crucial to understanding public reaction to life-saving warning information.
  10. The latest State Of The Climate report from NOAA is out…February 2019 was yet another month that has set a world-wide climate record being the fifth warmest February on record for the globe.
Infographic courtesy NOAA

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

One crucial element to being “severe weather savvy” is understanding the process of severe weather outlooks and local forecasts and warnings. The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) will issue daily thunderstorm outlooks. The risk categories can run from ‘general’ thunderstorms to the very rare High Risk scenarios. Understanding what each risk category means is very important. Equally important is to remember than Marginal or Slight does not mean that storms will be ‘marginally’ or ‘slightly’ severe. Tornadoes have occurred on Marginal Risk days. The SPC has further information on risk categories at this page. Your local National Weather Service office determines whether or not a thunderstorm meets severe criteria. The infographic below clearly explains what defines a severe thunderstorm.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post I’d like to extend a very warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media and a sincere “Thank You” for my long-time followers! Thanks to all of you for all the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links for February 16 – 23, 2019

Greetings everyone! We’ve got a wide selection of topics (#astronomy, #climate, #recycling, and more) to review, so lets’ get started.

  1. Here’s a very helpful privacy read that applies to all of us…even those who are particularly cautious about what online information they share. “How To Limit Which Companies Track Your Internet Activity.”
  2. Good writing in science is an essential talent in communicating information that is often bewildering to the general public. Writing for peer review or research presentations is equally important. Ultimately, you must be able to connect and communicate with people at all levels. Here’s an excellent read on some very good science writing tips.
  3. As of 19 February 2019, you can get the weather conditions on Mars from the NASA’s InSight lander!
  4. Here’s a view of Earth’s moon like no other. It’s made of 50,000 images rolled into one!
  5. Considering this is the 21st century, we can do much better than this. “A Whopping 91% Of Plastic Isn’t Recycled.”
  6. If you think that tornado-like vorticies are something that are exclusive to our planet, think again. Dust devils have proven to be quite common on Mars.
  7. An excellent viewpoint regarding a rational viewpoint on assessing the hazards of climate change. “Why You Shouldn’t Panic.”
  8. Some sound, thought provoking ideas here. “Climate change is not a “national emergency.”
  9. In case you missed it, here’s a look back at January 2019 round the globe. “The globally averaged temperature over land and ocean surfaces for January 2019 tied with 2007 as the third highest for the month of January in the NOAA global temperature record, which dates back to 1880.”
  10. The ramifications of climate change can show up in some unexpected places…like a hot dog restaurant.

Last but not least, the original Tornado Quest blog can be found for your reference convenience at this link.

Winter Weather Safety

Spring is on it’s way, but winter’s going to be around for many more weeks in the Northern Hemisphere. It’s never too late to review winter weather safety information. Here are some helpful winter weather links that will help you stay safe. Next week, look for Severe Weather Safety…it’s that time of year when severe thunderstorms and all the hazards they carry, become more of a threat.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NWS Fort Worth, Texas

National Weather Service Homepage

Winter Weather Safety and Awareness

Winter Storms: The Deceptive Killers

National Weather Service Wind Chill Chart

National Weather Service Printable PDF Wind Chill Chart

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

That’s a wrap for this post I’d like to extend a warm “Welcome” to my new followers in social media and a heart-felt sincere “Thank You” for my long-time followers! Thanks a million for all the support and kind words. Your friendship and loyalty is appreciated a great deal!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC