Tornado Quest Top Science Links For February 27 – March 6, 2021 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #weatherready #weathersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #airquality #health #astronomy

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Greetings to all and happy meteorological spring to my friends and followers in the Northern Hemisphere! This week, we’ll turn our attention to severe weather preparedness. As seasonal climate patterns change, so does the threat for severe weather across much of North America. This week’s post contains a plethora of good severe weather safety links. There are also several new, interesting stories to review, so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

THIS WEEK’S SEVERE WEATHER INFOGRAPHIC: WATCHES AND WARNINGS!

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, TX

PREPARING AN EMERGENCY KIT FOR HOME, VEHICLE, AND WORK

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

Social media is a very useful tool that can be misused for misinformation, disinformation, and hype. While this infographic is geared towards, winter weather, it certainly applies to ALL types of weather year round.

Infographic courtesy NWS Fort Worth, Texas

That’s a wrap for this post! Be sure to check in next week when we’ll take a look at tornado safety. I’d like to extend a big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy! See you next Saturday!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For February 19 – 26, 2021 #science #weather #meteorology #winter #winterstorm2021 #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #pollution #drought #droughtmonitor #nasa #perseverance

Much of the contiguous USA is recovering this week from an unusually robust cold wave that brought record breaking snowfall amounts, low temperatures, and wind chills across almost every state except Florida. Though much of the lower 48 is warming up, winter isn’t over yet. Below are several important infographics addressing wild chill and how to dress properly to best handle cold weather and retain body heat. We’ll explore more on winter weather safety with plenty of information in this week’s post. Next week, we’ll turn our attention to severe weather (thunderstorms, tornadoes, flash floods, et al.) preparedness. There are several new, interesting stories to review, so let’s get started.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NDMC/USDA

WINTER WEATHER SAFETY AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

With cooler temperature, snow, ice storms, et al. having settled in across much of the northern hemisphere, folks attention appropriately turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones, tornadoes, flooding, etc. are beneficial to have for winter weather.

NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This NOAA winter weather page has a myriad of links beneficial to organizations such as public services, schools, organizations, etc.

UNDERSTANDING WIND CHILL AND DRESSING FOR WINTER WEATHER

Infographic courtesy NWS Mobile, AL
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

PREPARING AN EMERGENCY KIT FOR HOME, VEHICLE, AND WORK

The handy checklist below from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

Social media is a very useful tool that can be misused for misinformation, disinformation, and hype. While this infographic is geared towards, winter weather, it certainly applies to all kinds of weather year round.

Infographic courtesy NWS Fort Worth, Texas

That’s a wrap for this post! Be sure to check in next week. I will be adding a plethora of information regarding severe weather and tornado safety. I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For December 25, 2020 – January 1, 2021 #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #weathersafety #wintersafety #windchill #climate #climatechange #environment #pollution #astronomy #health #education

The year of 2020 will go down in history as a watershed event for the planet Earth, the planet’s climate, and an insidious virus that led to the worse health crises in a century. There were several weather and climate events that will be landmark events as well. Many substantial winter weather events have taken place across North America and Europe as winter dominates the Northern Hemisphere. We’ll explore more on winter weather safety with plenty of information for the next several weeks. Please note that effective 1 January 2021, I will only post the top science links rather than pick ten. Quite often there are not enough quality stories to pass along and, like other media outlets, they present top stories but don’t go to the trouble of finding a specific number each week. This change allows me to share only the best with you. Let me also take a moment and wish all of you a happy and healthy 2021 and let you know how much I appreciate all of the support so many of you have given me over the past year. All of you are deeply appreciated. Having said that, lets get started.

WINTER WEATHER SAFETY AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

With cooler temperature, snow, ice storms, et al. having settled in across much of the northern hemisphere, folks attention appropriately turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones, tornadoes, flooding, etc. are beneficial to have for winter weather. NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This NOAA winter weather page has a myriad of links beneficial to organizations such as public services, schools, organizations, etc.

NOAA also has an excellent printable publication that covers winter weather safety which is one of the most underrated weather hazards. (12 page PDF file)

The handy checklist below from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

The hazards of wind chill should never be underestimated. A few simple steps of layering clothing can make a big difference. Even in full sun, wind chill can be a health hazard in temperatures as warm as 40F.

Infographic courtesy NWS Mobile, Alabama

Misinformation and disinformation is running rampant across social media platforms of all kinds as of late. I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Here’s an excellent and concise video on spotting misinformation you might see online. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Social media is a very useful tool that can be misused for misinformation, disinformation, and hype. While this infographic is geared towards, winter weather, it certainly applies to all kinds of weather year round.

Infographic courtesy NWS Fort Worth, Texas

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome and Happy New Year to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy! Here’s to a happier and healthier 2021!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For November 6 – 13, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #weathersafety #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #covid19 #pandemic #wearamask #scicomm

This past week saw Tropical Storm Theta as the 29th named storm of the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season…a season which will go in the record books. With the changing of the seasons in the northern hemisphere, attention will shift to winter weather safety. We’ll touch on that topic with plenty of information this week and in the weeks to come. There are many other good stories to cover this week, so lets get started.

Drought conditions for the contiguous USA in October 2020. Data courtesy NOAA

WINTER WEATHER AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season will officially end on 30 November 2020. This year will go down in the record books for having many elements of an extraordinary year. Now, across much of the northern hemisphere, attention turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones are beneficial to have for winter weather. NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Here’s an excellent and concise video on spotting misinformation you might see online. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 30 – November 6, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #weathersafety #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #covid19 #pandemic #wearamask

With the changing of the seasons in the northern hemisphere, attention will shift to winter weather safety. We’ll touch on that topic with plenty of information this week and in the weeks to come. There are many other good stories to cover this week, so lets get started.

WINTER WEATHER AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has officially come to an end. Though tropical cyclone activity can still occur, statistically we’re entering the end of the season. 2020 will go down in the record books for many facets of an extraordinary year. Now, across much of the northern hemisphere, attention turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones are beneficial to have for winter weather. NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Here’s an excellent and concise video on spotting misinformation you might see online. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For August 21 – 28, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #drought #hurricane #laura #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #environment #pollution #astronomy #covid19 #pandemic

Hurricane Laura shortly after making landfall on the Louisiana coast on 27 August 2020.

This has been a very active weather and climate week. For North America, Hurricane Laura was the biggest weather story with the Category 4 hurricane making landfall on the Louisiana coast around 1AM CDT on the 27 August 2020. From humble origins as a cluster of thunderstorms moving westward off the coast of Africa, a modest tropical wave transformed into a powerful storm while traveling thousands of miles and going through explosive intensification in the Gulf Of Mexico. The devastating wildfires in California, Colorado, and elsewhere were also front and center. As usual, there are many other topics to cover plus a review of hurricane preparedness, so let’s get started.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NIDIS

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this year. In the central and eastern Pacific, several named storms have taken place. The Atlantic has been unusually active with, as of August 28th, thirteen named storms having taken place so far in 2020 with several more weeks in the hurricane season left to go. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are always an excellent source with potentially life-saving information that is specific to your local situation. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 31 – August 7, 2020 #science #climate #climatechange #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #disasterprep #spacex #nasa #astronomy #mars

Hurricane Katrina approaches the central USA Gulf Coast on 28 August 2005. Satellite image courtesy NOAA.

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is a daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, nine named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at a checklist for assembling an emergency kit and hurricane preparedness…so let’s get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this summer. In the central Pacific, Douglas took a swipe at Hawaii. Hanna made landfall in Texas and Isaias on the USA’s east coast. The Atlantic has been unusually active with nine named storms having taken place by the end of July…and the peak of hurricane season is still ahead. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kits for home and your place of work.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are always an excellent source as well. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 17 – 24, 2020 #science #environment #pollution #astronomy #weather #hurricane #tropics #heatsafety #covid19 #drought #emergencyprep

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As usual, we’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be a continuing daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, seven named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at heat safety and a checklist for assembling an emergency kit…so let’s get started.

Looking into the eye of the beast. Image courtesy NOAA/NWS
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2557.png
Graphic courtesy NIDIS/Drought.gov

This handy checklist will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For those in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kit for home and/or your place of work.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

So far in 2020, eleven children have died across the USA from heat illnesses while in automobiles. Two of these deaths occurred in Tulsa, OK after a brother and sister were in a car for approximately five hours. All of these deaths are even the more tragic since they were all preventable. Temperatures as low as 78F-80F can become lethal.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

This is an infographic explaining the symptoms of the two most common kinds of heat illnesses. Heat stroke is especially deadly and paramedics should be summoned as quickly as possible.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For April 17 – 24, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus and Covid-19 situation is foremost on everyone’s mind with a world-wide pandemic that’s like nothing the world’s current population has ever seen. Additionally, the spring severe weather season is in full swing across the contiguous USA. On the positive side, Earth day was this week and it’s still Citizen Science Month. We’ll cover that topic and more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

One of the most dangerous mistakes that motorists make during a storm is taking shelter under and overpass. This has proven time and time again to be extremely dangerous…and deadly.

infographic courtesy National Weather Service, Norman, OK

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

hat’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For April 10 – 17, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus and Covid-19 situation is foremost on everyone’s mind with a world-wide pandemic that’s like nothing the world’s current population has ever seen. Additionally, the spring severe weather season is in full swing across the contiguous USA. We’ll cover that topic and more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

This simple guideline to sheltering can save your life. Even in the weakest of tornadoes, worst and bad options can result in serious injury or death.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch