Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For June 12 – 19, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #hurricane #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #covid19 #pandemic

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be an obstacle in dealing with the pandemic and finding a long-term path of adaptation. The North American spring severe weather season has slowed a bit, but and uptick in activity will inevitably take place. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historical start. We’ll also take a look at summer heat safety information and much more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

Hurricanes and pandemics…the perfect, deadly storm.

SUMMER HEAT SAFETY AND WEATHER PREPAREDNESS DURING THE SEVERE WEATHER AND HURRICANE SEASON

Summer is fully entrenched across much of North America with drought conditions in several western and central states exacerbating the oppressive heat. Being aware of the heat index is essential to staying safe and avoiding heat related illnesses.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Heat safety is very important to practice regardless of where you are. As the days get hotter in the Northern Hemisphere, our chances for heat illnesses increases exponentially.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Knowing where to get reliable, accurate, and timely weather information can be a daunting task, especially for folks who are new to a region that may be prone to a hurricane risk, winter storms, or episodes of severe weather (large hail, damaging straight line winds, and tornadoes). This infographic from NOAA’s National Weather Service will help you through the murky haze of misinformation and hype and is valid year round for every kind of weather situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Regardless of where you live, an emergency kit is and essential part of every well-prepared home or place of work. This checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. If you live in a hurricane prone region, prepare now while you have time and supplies are still plentiful.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For May 1 – 8, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus and Covid-19 situation is foremost on everyone’s mind with a world-wide pandemic that’s like nothing the world’s current population has ever seen. Additionally, the spring severe weather season is in full swing across the contiguous USA.. We’ve some tornado safety information and more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

Here’s a concise reminder on taking shelter during a tornado warning. Where you take shelter is quite often a matter of life and death or serious injury.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For April 24 – May 1, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus and Covid-19 situation is foremost on everyone’s mind with a world-wide pandemic that’s like nothing the world’s current population has ever seen. Additionally, the spring severe weather season is in full swing across the contiguous USA. On the positive side, Citizen Science Month is wrapping up, but there are plenty of projects for you to get involved in. We’ll cover that topic and more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Flooding kills more people in the USA than any other weather related hazard. Flash flooding that occurs during and/or after thunderstorms is particularly dangerous. The National Weather Service has more information on flood safety and the Turn Around, Don’t Drown safety campaign.

Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For April 17 – 24, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus and Covid-19 situation is foremost on everyone’s mind with a world-wide pandemic that’s like nothing the world’s current population has ever seen. Additionally, the spring severe weather season is in full swing across the contiguous USA. On the positive side, Earth day was this week and it’s still Citizen Science Month. We’ll cover that topic and more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

One of the most dangerous mistakes that motorists make during a storm is taking shelter under and overpass. This has proven time and time again to be extremely dangerous…and deadly.

infographic courtesy National Weather Service, Norman, OK

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

hat’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For February 28 – March 6, 2020 – #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #severeweather #tnwx #climate #climatechange #environment #citizenscience #citsci #weatherready #astronomy

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. On a more personal note, I appreciate the continued best wishes for recovery and good health during my rehabilitation from prostate cancer surgery. You folks are awesome! Now…let’s get started on this week’s reads.

Storm Prediction Center Severe Weather Risk Categories And Associated Hazards.

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For October 19 – 26, 2019 #science #climate #weather #climatechange #environment #wildfire #airquality #public health

Greetings again to one and all! Here’s a review of my intro from the last two weeks. After a few months on hiatus for health reasons, I’ve decided to resume this weekly blog which contains my personal choices of the top ten science reads from the past week. This post will be published every Saturday between 12:00pm and 3:00pm Central USA Time (1700 UTC to 2000 UTC). The selection will be subjective, but lean heavily towards what my followers in social media are interested in. There will be seasonal emphasis on the severe weather season across North America and the Atlantic hurricane season. During the next few weeks, there will be a few things to be ironed out, so the usual bugs and/or changes are likely to happen. The topics will be from a wide variety of science interests; astronomy, weather and meteorology, climate and climate change, environmental science topics, the occasional quixotic read, and much, much more. On a personal note, I appreciate the ‘good vibes’ and wishes for a speedy recovery. I am in the middle of a long rehabilitation regime from prostate cancer surgery and to say it is a daunting challenge is an understatement. I have many long months ahead and your kind and caring words mean the world to me. A medical situation such as this certainly has made me take pause and reevaluate the priorities in my life.

On that note, let’s take a look at this week’s reads.

Infographic courtesy World Health Organization

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross can be very helpful in putting together a disaster preparedness kit. This emergency kit can also be applicable in many different climates and for all seasons.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, pay me a visit and let us connect. A million ‘thank you’ again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. Cancer does not have to be a automatic death sentence, and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss with your doctor getting your PSA tested. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For April 13 – 20, 2019

Greetings to one and all! I hope your spring…or autumn…is going well. In the last week, we’ve had quite a round of severe weather across several states with all hazards, including tornadoes, having taken place. We’ve just observed Citizen Science Day and there are a two posts with great ways to take part in citizen science and collect or record weather data. Data from the USA’s Hurricane Michael was reevaluated and it’s become one of only four Category 5 hurricanes to make landfall in USA history. As usual, there are plenty of severe weather preparedness infographics and links along with other topics, so let’s get started.

Hurricane Michael…now one of only four Category 5 hurricanes to make landfall in the USA.
Satellite image courtesy NOAA.
  1. Citizen Science Day was observed this past week. There are 2 ways you can indulge your weather geek…the 1st one is for the mPING app (iOS & Android) & helps research meteorologists gather data.
  2. The other weather Citizen Science Project is to join – CoCoRaHS: send in precipitation reports year round in the USA & Canada to help with important precipitation data records.
  3. Detecting small earthquakes can be a major challenge for seismologists. New data from studies done on California earthquakes show that small temblors occur up to ten times as often as previously thought.
  4. For Earth Day 2019, take your kids outside…and make sure you also get out and enjoy the magic of nature.
  5. The Earth’s global wind patterns are responsible for a great deal of weather events and also transport vast amounts of dust across continents and oceans. As of late, they’ve also been transporting micro-plastics to some of the most remote locations on the planet.
  6. A new research project from NASA further reinforces what many other studies have shown regarding global increases in temperature.
  7. Looking at climates of the past can give us valuable insight on climate patterns of the future. “A climate change preview: Trees at the South Pole, 60 feet of sea-level rise.”
  8. If you read any article about weather today, this excellent one by Dr. Marshall Shepherd should be THE one! “The Top 7 Most Unreasonable Expectations About Weather Forecasts.”
  9. NOAA has revised the rating of Hurricane Michael.
    Michael is the first hurricane to make landfall in the United States as a category 5 since Hurricane Andrew in 1992, and only the fourth on record. The others are the Labor Day Hurricane in 1935 and Hurricane Camille in 1969. Michael is also the strongest hurricane landfall on record in the Florida Panhandle and only the second known category 5 landfall on the northern Gulf coast.”
  10. Last but not least, the ugly side of selfish, immature, humanity brings itself to the surface when non-essential programming is momentarily interrupted by potentially life-saving weather information during a tornado warning.
    To everyone sending me death threats right now: you wouldn’t be saying a damn thing if a tornado was ravaging your home this afternoon. Lives are more important than 5 minutes of golf. I will continue to repeat that if and when we cut into programming to keep people safe.”

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS/SPC


When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS Amarillo

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Image courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very warm “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, here’s a sincere “Thank You!” I appreciate all of the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC