Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 31 – August 7, 2020 #science #climate #climatechange #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #disasterprep #spacex #nasa #astronomy #mars

Hurricane Katrina approaches the central USA Gulf Coast on 28 August 2005. Satellite image courtesy NOAA.

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is a daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, nine named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at a checklist for assembling an emergency kit and hurricane preparedness…so let’s get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this summer. In the central Pacific, Douglas took a swipe at Hawaii. Hanna made landfall in Texas and Isaias on the USA’s east coast. The Atlantic has been unusually active with nine named storms having taken place by the end of July…and the peak of hurricane season is still ahead. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kits for home and your place of work.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are always an excellent source as well. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 17 – 24, 2020 #science #environment #pollution #astronomy #weather #hurricane #tropics #heatsafety #covid19 #drought #emergencyprep

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As usual, we’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be a continuing daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, seven named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at heat safety and a checklist for assembling an emergency kit…so let’s get started.

Looking into the eye of the beast. Image courtesy NOAA/NWS
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Graphic courtesy NIDIS/Drought.gov

This handy checklist will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For those in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kit for home and/or your place of work.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

So far in 2020, eleven children have died across the USA from heat illnesses while in automobiles. Two of these deaths occurred in Tulsa, OK after a brother and sister were in a car for approximately five hours. All of these deaths are even the more tragic since they were all preventable. Temperatures as low as 78F-80F can become lethal.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

This is an infographic explaining the symptoms of the two most common kinds of heat illnesses. Heat stroke is especially deadly and paramedics should be summoned as quickly as possible.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For July 10 – 17, 2020

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As usual, we’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be a continuing daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, six named storms having taken place. We’ll also take a look at summer heat safety and much more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SUMMER HEAT SAFETY

The summer heat is fully settled in across much of the Northern Hemisphere. With that comes an increase in heat related illnesses. These handy infographics from NOAA will help you stay safe in the coming weeks.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross is an excellent starting point for anyone assembling an emergency kit. Even if you live in an area that is not prone to severe weather or hurricanes, an emergency kit is an essential part of a home and workplace.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For June 12 – 19, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #hurricane #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #covid19 #pandemic

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be an obstacle in dealing with the pandemic and finding a long-term path of adaptation. The North American spring severe weather season has slowed a bit, but and uptick in activity will inevitably take place. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historical start. We’ll also take a look at summer heat safety information and much more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

Hurricanes and pandemics…the perfect, deadly storm.

SUMMER HEAT SAFETY AND WEATHER PREPAREDNESS DURING THE SEVERE WEATHER AND HURRICANE SEASON

Summer is fully entrenched across much of North America with drought conditions in several western and central states exacerbating the oppressive heat. Being aware of the heat index is essential to staying safe and avoiding heat related illnesses.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Heat safety is very important to practice regardless of where you are. As the days get hotter in the Northern Hemisphere, our chances for heat illnesses increases exponentially.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Knowing where to get reliable, accurate, and timely weather information can be a daunting task, especially for folks who are new to a region that may be prone to a hurricane risk, winter storms, or episodes of severe weather (large hail, damaging straight line winds, and tornadoes). This infographic from NOAA’s National Weather Service will help you through the murky haze of misinformation and hype and is valid year round for every kind of weather situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Regardless of where you live, an emergency kit is and essential part of every well-prepared home or place of work. This checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. If you live in a hurricane prone region, prepare now while you have time and supplies are still plentiful.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For January 24 – 31 , 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #climate #climatechange #australia #brushfire #environment #wintersafety #scicomm

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. The Australian brushfires are still a big story if for no other reason that it is a watershed event. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. On a more personal note, I appreciate the continued best wishes for recovery during my rehabilitation from prostate cancer surgery. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s reads.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. As of this post, I’m still recovering well from surgery. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For January 17 – 24 , 2020 #science #weather #weatherforecasting #meteorology #climate #climatechange #australia #brushfire #nasa #noaa #environment

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. The Australian brushfires are still a big story if for no other reason that it is a watershed event. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. On a more personal note, I appreciate the continued best wishes for a speedy recovery during my rehabilitation from prostate cancer surgery. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s reads.

Photography credit: Matthew Abbott/New York Times/Redux/eyevine
Infographic courtesy NOAA

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. As of this post, I’m still recovering well from surgery. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

As our climate warms, even in traditionally hot regions, the ‘silent killer’ is taking its toll. “Heat Deaths Jump in Southwest United States, Puzzling Officials.” @nytimes #climate #heat #azwx #nvwx

The number of heat-related deaths has more than tripled in Arizona and Nevada since 2014, new data show, raising concern about the limits of adaptation. www.nytimes.com/2019/08/26/climate/heat-deaths-southwest.html

The Heat Index: What Your Body Thinks The Temperature Is On Warm & Hot Days. #heat #heatwave #heatindex #summersafety #heatsafety

This chart shows you the Heat Index…which is the temperature your body is reacting to regardless of the actual air temperature. Obviously the drier the air, the easier it is on your body to handle the heat. Depending on your physical condition & level of hydration, the indices in the white range can be tolerated well if you pace yourself. The beige, yellow, orange, and red indices are where even the most physically fit and well hydrated people can get into trouble very, very fast. If you’re in doubt, pace yourself, stay very well hydrated, and don’t forget the sunscreen. Those UV rays will wreck havoc on your skin.