Tornado Quest Top Science Links For April 9 – 16, 2022

Greetings to everyone! I hope this week’s post finds all of you happy, healthy, and doing well. We’ll continue sharing severe weather preparedness information this week with a infographic on the best choice of a safe place during a tornado warning. There are many other interesting topics to cover this week, so let’s get started.

Map of the 10 April 1979 Red River Valley tornado outbreak. Image courtesy NWS Norman, OK

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS Norman, OK

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving, information on winter storm watches, warnings, and other related weather advisories! None of the links on this website should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! Thanks to everyone for stopping by. A big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, or Facebook, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, stay safe, stay positive, and test negative!

See you next Saturday!

Tornado Quest micro-podcast for April 9 – 16 2022

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Please note: queries regarding marketing, promotions, sales schemes, prizes, or papers/research that have not been under & approved by scientific peer review will not be accepted.

Copyright © 1998 – 2022 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For September 4 – 11, 2021

Hurricane Laura approaches the Louisiana coast on 26 August 2020.

The past week has seen many big science stories come across our news feeds. From Hurricane Ida and the devastation in its wake to the COVID-19 pandemic to the rapid increase in climate change, there has been no shortage of stories. For North America, the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season is upon us. This week’s post has a plethora of links to help you with hurricane preparations. There are many more weeks left in the Atlantic hurricane season, so now is the time to prepare for the storm you hope never happens. Much of western North America is still dealing with wildfires and a severe drought. There are many other good science reads to review for this week, so let’s get started.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

HURRICANE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

The official start of the Atlantic hurricane season began June 1, 2021. As is the case with most years, the late summer and autumn months comes the peak of activity. This is a list of tropical cyclone safety and preparedness links that I hope you’ll find helpful and spearhead your preparedness plan. None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

WEATHER  DATA

National Hurricane Center

Tropical Atlantic

Central Pacific Hurricane Center

National Weather Service Homepage

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Climate Prediction Center

Storm Prediction Center

National Data Buoy Center

NCAR Tropical Cyclone Guidance Project

HURRICANE SAFETY & EDUCATIONAL  INFORMATION

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

The following infographics cover many important topics including emergency kits, staying informed, and avoiding misinformation and disinformation that are applicable to tropical cyclone scenarios. Tornadoes are also common in land-falling tropical storms and hurricanes. If in doubt, always stay with OFFICIAL sources of important information, forecasts, and warnings.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross
Graphic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

Even though this infographic is focused on winter weather, it certainly applies to weather information year round. Diligence from January through December is important to cull through misinformation, disinformation, and unfounded rumors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS Fort Worth, TX

Please keep in mind that ONLY NOAA weather radio, your local National Weather Service office, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving information on hurricane/tropical storm watches, warnings, and other related warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! Next week we’ll continue information on hurricane preparedness and safety. A big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, get vaccinated, sport a spiffy mask, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay positive, and test negative!

See you next Saturday!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Please note: queries regarding marketing, promotions, sales schemes, prizes, or papers/research that have not been under & approved by scientific peer review will not be accepted.

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For June 12 – 19, 2021

Six tropical cyclones in progress simultaneously from the east Pacific to central Atlantic on 14 September 2020.
Image courtesy NOAA.

Greetings to one and all! I hope this week’s post finds you happy, healthy and the weather is to your liking. Across North America, the severe weather season continues. Meanwhile, the Atlantic hurricane season officially began on June 1st. An active season is forecast. As of this post, Claudette, the third tropical cyclone of the Atlantic season, has made landfall on the central USA gulf coast. There’s a complete page of information on hurricane safety in this week’s post. There are many other good science reads to review for this week, so let’s get started.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

HURRICANE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

The official start of the Atlantic hurricane season began June 1, 2021. As is the case with most years, the late summer and autumn months comes the peak of activity. This is a list of tropical cyclone safety and preparedness links that I hope you’ll find helpful and spearhead your preparedness plan. None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

WEATHER  DATA

National Hurricane Center

Tropical Atlantic

Central Pacific Hurricane Center

National Weather Service Homepage

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Climate Prediction Center

Storm Prediction Center

National Data Buoy Center

NCAR Tropical Cyclone Guidance Project

HURRICANE SAFETY & EDUCATIONAL  INFORMATION

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

The following infographics cover many important topics including emergency preparedness, flood safety, and tornado sheltering information which is also applicable to structures that are subject to tropical cyclone winds. Tornadoes are also common in land-falling tropical storms and hurricanes. Residents in those areas should be ready to take shelter if a tornado warning is issued. Other infographics deal with misinformation that you may encounter in social media. If in doubt, always stay with OFFICIAL sources of important information, forecasts, and warnings.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross
Graphic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

Even though this infographic is focused on winter weather, it certainly applies to weather information year round. Diligence from January through December is important to cull through misinformation, disinformation, and unfounded rumors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS Fort Worth, TX
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

Please keep in mind that ONLY NOAA weather radio, your local National Weather Service office, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving information on hurricane/tropical storm watches, warnings, and other related warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’d like a detailed review of tornado and severe weather safety, please review April and May posts. Next week we’ll continue information on hurricane preparedness. I’d like to extend a big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, get vaccinated, sport a spiffy mask, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

See you next Saturday!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Please note: queries regarding marketing, promotions, sales schemes, prizes, or papers/research that have not been under & approved by scientific peer review WILL NOT be accepted.

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For February 19 – 26, 2021 #science #weather #meteorology #winter #winterstorm2021 #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #pollution #drought #droughtmonitor #nasa #perseverance

Much of the contiguous USA is recovering this week from an unusually robust cold wave that brought record breaking snowfall amounts, low temperatures, and wind chills across almost every state except Florida. Though much of the lower 48 is warming up, winter isn’t over yet. Below are several important infographics addressing wild chill and how to dress properly to best handle cold weather and retain body heat. We’ll explore more on winter weather safety with plenty of information in this week’s post. Next week, we’ll turn our attention to severe weather (thunderstorms, tornadoes, flash floods, et al.) preparedness. There are several new, interesting stories to review, so let’s get started.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NDMC/USDA

WINTER WEATHER SAFETY AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

With cooler temperature, snow, ice storms, et al. having settled in across much of the northern hemisphere, folks attention appropriately turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones, tornadoes, flooding, etc. are beneficial to have for winter weather.

NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This NOAA winter weather page has a myriad of links beneficial to organizations such as public services, schools, organizations, etc.

UNDERSTANDING WIND CHILL AND DRESSING FOR WINTER WEATHER

Infographic courtesy NWS Mobile, AL
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

PREPARING AN EMERGENCY KIT FOR HOME, VEHICLE, AND WORK

The handy checklist below from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

Social media is a very useful tool that can be misused for misinformation, disinformation, and hype. While this infographic is geared towards, winter weather, it certainly applies to all kinds of weather year round.

Infographic courtesy NWS Fort Worth, Texas

That’s a wrap for this post! Be sure to check in next week. I will be adding a plethora of information regarding severe weather and tornado safety. I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For October 19 – 26, 2019 #science #climate #weather #climatechange #environment #wildfire #airquality #public health

Greetings again to one and all! Here’s a review of my intro from the last two weeks. After a few months on hiatus for health reasons, I’ve decided to resume this weekly blog which contains my personal choices of the top ten science reads from the past week. This post will be published every Saturday between 12:00pm and 3:00pm Central USA Time (1700 UTC to 2000 UTC). The selection will be subjective, but lean heavily towards what my followers in social media are interested in. There will be seasonal emphasis on the severe weather season across North America and the Atlantic hurricane season. During the next few weeks, there will be a few things to be ironed out, so the usual bugs and/or changes are likely to happen. The topics will be from a wide variety of science interests; astronomy, weather and meteorology, climate and climate change, environmental science topics, the occasional quixotic read, and much, much more. On a personal note, I appreciate the ‘good vibes’ and wishes for a speedy recovery. I am in the middle of a long rehabilitation regime from prostate cancer surgery and to say it is a daunting challenge is an understatement. I have many long months ahead and your kind and caring words mean the world to me. A medical situation such as this certainly has made me take pause and reevaluate the priorities in my life.

On that note, let’s take a look at this week’s reads.

Infographic courtesy World Health Organization

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross can be very helpful in putting together a disaster preparedness kit. This emergency kit can also be applicable in many different climates and for all seasons.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, pay me a visit and let us connect. A million ‘thank you’ again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. Cancer does not have to be a automatic death sentence, and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss with your doctor getting your PSA tested. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers!

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC