Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For November 13 – 20, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #weathersafety #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #renewables #covid19 #pandemic #wearamask

Hurricane Iota at category 5 intensity on 16 November 2020

This year has seen an unprecedented degree of tropical cyclone activity in the Atlantic basin. Hurricane Iota, which may well be the last storm of the Atlantic season, was the most powerful reaching Category 5 status before making landfall in Nicaragua, the second hurricane to affect that country in two weeks. With the changing of the seasons in the northern hemisphere, attention will shift to winter weather safety. We’ll touch on that topic with plenty of information for the next several weeks. There are many other good stories to cover, so lets get started.

Graphic courtesy NOAA

WINTER WEATHER AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season will officially end on 30 November 2020. This year will go down in the record books for having many elements of an extraordinary year. Now, across much of the northern hemisphere, attention turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones are beneficial to have for winter weather. NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need. NOAA also has an excellent publication that covers one of the most underrated weather hazards. (12 page PDF file)

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

Misinformation and disinformation is running rampant across social media platforms of all kinds as of late. I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Here’s an excellent and concise video on spotting misinformation you might see online. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 30 – November 6, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #weathersafety #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #covid19 #pandemic #wearamask

With the changing of the seasons in the northern hemisphere, attention will shift to winter weather safety. We’ll touch on that topic with plenty of information this week and in the weeks to come. There are many other good stories to cover this week, so lets get started.

WINTER WEATHER AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has officially come to an end. Though tropical cyclone activity can still occur, statistically we’re entering the end of the season. 2020 will go down in the record books for many facets of an extraordinary year. Now, across much of the northern hemisphere, attention turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones are beneficial to have for winter weather. NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Here’s an excellent and concise video on spotting misinformation you might see online. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 16 – 23, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #recycling #environment #covid19 #pandemic

Atlantic Hurricane Epsilon shortly after reaching Category 3 status on 21 October 2020

After many weeks of extraordinary activity, the tropical Atlantic is considerably quiet as the hurricane season slowly winds down. The lone exception is Hurricane Epsilon which reached major hurricane status on 21 October 2020 as a late season Atlantic tropical cyclone. 2020 will go in the record books as a very extraordinary year. Wildfires and drought continue to plague much of North America with no immediate relief in sight. There are many other good stories to cover this week including a successful spacecraft mission to and asteroid, so lets get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

2020 continues to be on track as a record year for the Atlantic hurricane season. Fortunately, the official end of the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is coming soon. Regardless, it’s important to not let your guard down. Late season tropical storms and hurricanes can occur and catch people off guard who think the danger is over for the year. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 25 – October 2, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #prostatecancer

A visible satellite view of the busiest segment of the 2020 eastern Pacific and Atlantic tropical cyclone season.

The wildfires in California are, as of this post, showing no signs of letting up. In the meantime, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is much quieter, but many more weeks remain. As usual, there are several good stories to cover this week including a good read on a shift in tornado occurrence patterns, so lets get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this year. In the central and eastern Pacific, several named storms have taken place. The Atlantic has been unusually active with, as of September 18th, twenty-two named storms having taken place so far in 2020 with several more weeks in the hurricane season left to go. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

SEPTEMBER IS PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH!

September may have come to an end, but that doesn’t mean an end to the need for prostate cancer awareness. Prostate cancer has touch my life and, as a result, changed my outlook on life forever. It’s not an ‘old man’s’ disease. Many men in their forties are diagnosed with prostate cancer. For men, it’s the second leading cause of death by cancer. My diagnosis came about as a result of a routine PSA test from my general practitioner. Regardless of your family history, race, ethnic background, socioeconomic status, etc., don’t think it can’t happen to you. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. Make sure you educate yourself as much as possible about this disease. You may save your life or the life of a loved one.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 4 – 11, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #environment #covid19 #pandemic #prostatecancer

The past two weeks have been very active across much of North America and in tropical regions around the globe. The ongoing wildfires across much of the western and mountain states of the USA have sent large plumes of smoke across much of the continent. Ramifications from Hurricane Laura and the Midwestern derecho of early August will be felt for some time. The tropical Atlantic has also continued to be active. We’ve still several weeks left in the Atlantic hurricane season, so I have included information on hurricane and disaster preparedness. There are several other good stories to cover this week, so lets get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this year. In the central and eastern Pacific, several named storms have taken place. The Atlantic has been unusually active with, as of September 11th, eighteen named storms having taken place so far in 2020 with several more weeks in the hurricane season left to go. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are always an excellent source with potentially life-saving information that is specific to your local situation. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

SEPTEMBER IS PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH!

Prostate cancer has touch my life and, as a result, changed my outlook on life forever. It’s not an ‘old man’s’ disease. Many men in their forties are diagnosed with prostate cancer. For men, it’s the second leading cause of death by cancer. My diagnosis came about as a result of a routine PSA test from my general practitioner. Regardless of your family history, race, ethnic background, socioeconomic status, etc., don’t think it can’t happen to you. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. Make sure you educate yourself as much as possible about this disease. You may save your life or the life of a loved one.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 17 – 24, 2020 #science #environment #pollution #astronomy #weather #hurricane #tropics #heatsafety #covid19 #drought #emergencyprep

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As usual, we’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be a continuing daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, seven named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at heat safety and a checklist for assembling an emergency kit…so let’s get started.

Looking into the eye of the beast. Image courtesy NOAA/NWS
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is img_2557.png
Graphic courtesy NIDIS/Drought.gov

This handy checklist will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For those in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kit for home and/or your place of work.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

So far in 2020, eleven children have died across the USA from heat illnesses while in automobiles. Two of these deaths occurred in Tulsa, OK after a brother and sister were in a car for approximately five hours. All of these deaths are even the more tragic since they were all preventable. Temperatures as low as 78F-80F can become lethal.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

This is an infographic explaining the symptoms of the two most common kinds of heat illnesses. Heat stroke is especially deadly and paramedics should be summoned as quickly as possible.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For June 12 – 19, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #hurricane #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #covid19 #pandemic

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be an obstacle in dealing with the pandemic and finding a long-term path of adaptation. The North American spring severe weather season has slowed a bit, but and uptick in activity will inevitably take place. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historical start. We’ll also take a look at summer heat safety information and much more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

Hurricanes and pandemics…the perfect, deadly storm.

SUMMER HEAT SAFETY AND WEATHER PREPAREDNESS DURING THE SEVERE WEATHER AND HURRICANE SEASON

Summer is fully entrenched across much of North America with drought conditions in several western and central states exacerbating the oppressive heat. Being aware of the heat index is essential to staying safe and avoiding heat related illnesses.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Heat safety is very important to practice regardless of where you are. As the days get hotter in the Northern Hemisphere, our chances for heat illnesses increases exponentially.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Knowing where to get reliable, accurate, and timely weather information can be a daunting task, especially for folks who are new to a region that may be prone to a hurricane risk, winter storms, or episodes of severe weather (large hail, damaging straight line winds, and tornadoes). This infographic from NOAA’s National Weather Service will help you through the murky haze of misinformation and hype and is valid year round for every kind of weather situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Regardless of where you live, an emergency kit is and essential part of every well-prepared home or place of work. This checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. If you live in a hurricane prone region, prepare now while you have time and supplies are still plentiful.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For March 13 – 20, 2020 – #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #severeweather #climate #climatechange #environment #renewables #solar #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus is the big story with the USA now under, as of 13 March 2020, a national emergency and a world-wide pandemic that’s like nothing the world’s population has never seen. We’ll cover that topic with several of this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

Tornado Safety Guidelines

Severe weather and tornadoes may be the last thing many want to hear about, but it is that time of year and to deny or avoid that reality is to invite trouble. With the arrival of spring in the Northern Hemisphere, we have our biggest annual increase in severe weather activity. For much of North America, that also means a substantial increase in tornado activity. If you are in a Tornado Warning, it’s imperative that you do not ignore the warming or listen for sirens. “Tornado warning sirens” are cold-war era technology that is ineffective. When you do take shelter, please follow the following guidelines from NOAA & the National Weather Service.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS/FEMA
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

UNDER NO CIRCUMSTANCES SHOULD YOU TAKE SHELTER FROM A STORM AND/OR TORNADO IN AN UNDERPASS!

Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please follow good personal hygiene and prescribed by official sources, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For November 15 – 22, 2019 #science #climate #weather #climatechange #environment #pollution #airquality #wildfire #wintersafety #movember

Greetings once again to one and all! Here’s a more concise overview of my intro from the last few weeks. After a few months on hiatus for health reasons, I’ve decided to resume this weekly blog of my choice of top ten science reads from the past week. This will be published every Friday between 2:00pm and 3:00pm Central USA Time (2000 UTC to 2100 UTC). Coverage will be what my followers in social media are interested in and other topics that are of scientific importance; astronomy, weather and meteorology, climate and climate change, environmental science topics, the occasional quixotic read, and much, much more. On a personal note, I appreciate the many best wishes for a speedy recovery during my rehabilitation from prostate cancer surgery. To say it is a daunting challenge is an understatement. A medical situation such as this certainly has made me take pause and reevaluate the priorities in my life. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s reads.

Burning boards arranged in a rough triangle allow air to swirl into the central area, where another fire gathers the rotation into a vortex. Forest or urban fires of certain shapes can similarly generate fire tornadoes.
Credit: Spencer Lowell

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so is Tornado Quest. I’d like to thank so many of you again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. As of this post, I’m still recovering well from surgery. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For October 12 – 19, 2019 #science #climate #weather #climatechange #environment #hurricaneprep

Greetings to one and all! Here’s a review of my intro from last week. After a few months on hiatus for health reasons, I’ve decided to resume the weekly blog with a subjective view of the top ten science reads from the past week. This post will be published every Saturday between 12:00pm and 2:00pm Central USA Time (1800 UTC – 200 UTC). As I mentioned, the selection will be subjective, but lean heavily towards what my followers in social media are interested in. There will be seasonal emphasis on the severe weather season across North America and the Atlantic hurricane season. During the next few weeks, there will be a few kinks to be ironed out, so expect a few bugs and/or changes to come along. The topics will be from a wide variety of science interests; astronomy, weather and meteorology, climate and climate change, environmental science topics, the occasional quixotic read, and much, much more. On a more personal note, I appreciate the ‘good vibes’ and wishes for a speedy recovery as I am in the middle of a long rehabilitation regime from prostate cancer surgery. I have a daunting challenge ahead of me and your kind and caring words mean the world to me. A medical situation such as this certainly has made me take pause and reevaluate the priorities in my life.

Without further delay, let’s get started on this week’s links.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross can be very helpful in putting together a disaster preparedness kit.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, pay me a visit and let us connect. A million ‘thank you’ again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. Cancer does not have to be a automatic death sentence, and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss with your doctor getting tested. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC