Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For October 2 – 9, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #wildfire #astronomy #covid19 #pandemic

Whether it’s a hurricane, a tornado, or winter storms, your NOAA weather radio should be at the ready year round. Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

As of this post, all eyes are on Hurricane Delta, the second hurricane of the Atlantic 2020 to make landfall on the central USA Gulf Coast. Delta is a perfect example of a hurricane that has achieved major status during it’s life cycle after starting out with very humble origins. This kind of rapid intensification is something we’ll be seeing more often. This week’s post includes information and links on hurricane preparation. In addition, western USA wildfires continue to rage out of control and a gigafire…the first million acre wildfire on record, has taken place. As a result, air quality for many regions far from the fires has become a significant public health issue. There are many other good stories to cover this week, so lets get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

Hurricane Delta is, as of this post, forecast to make landfall on the USA’s Gulf Coast. 2020 is on track to be a record years for the Atlantic hurricane season. In the central and eastern Pacific, several named storms have taken place. The Atlantic has been unusually active with, as of September 18th, twenty-two named storms having taken place so far in 2020 with several more weeks in the hurricane season left to go. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 18 – 25, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #prostatecancer

The past few days have been very busy across the North American continent. Western wildfires have sent large plumes of smoke thousands of miles from their point of origin as an unprecedented wildfire season continues. In the Atlantic tropical basin, a very busy hurricane season has been underway. Of course, there are several other good stories to cover this week including a good read on a shift in tornado occurrence patterns, so lets get started.

  • This is not a little disturbing. Unfortunately, this is a trend that has been growing globally. “Censored: Australian scientists say suppression of environment research is getting worse.”
  • The weather on other planets is always fascinating. In the case of Venus, the clouds are particularly toxic.
  • We not only deal with the variables in weather and climate, but space weather as well. Changes that occur on a regular basis with our Sun have significant effects on our daily lives. NASA and NOAA have compiled data on a new solar cycle and what we can expect here on Earth.
  • Astronomers face many challenges in doing research and looking into deep space from our planet. Here’s an excellent and concise overview of some of those challenges and proposed solutions.
  • Significant public health ramifications with this scenario. “Oregon’s air quality is so far beyond ‘hazardous’ that no one knows what it means for health.”
  • While on the topic of air quality, here’s an excellent read on the importance of indoor air quality which is especially important in the middle of a global pandemic. “Smoke and COVID-19 drove us inside — but the air in there wants to kill you.”
  • This is an essential read on climate and the immediate challenges that we face. “Climate Disruption Is Now Locked In. The Next Moves Will Be Critical.”
  • “Warming temperatures are driving Arctic greening.” This study is the first to measure vegetation changes spanning the entire Arctic tundra using Landsat data from NASA and the USGS.
  • Here’s yet another ‘new normal’ concerning the Arctic. “Arctic sea ice hits second-lowest level on record.”
  • Last but not least, an important read on shifting patterns in tornado occurrence across the USA. In recent years, there’s been a notable shift in tornado frequency from the traditional ‘Tornado Alley’ to the southern states. With that shift has come a significant increase in tornado related deaths.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this year. In the central and eastern Pacific, several named storms have taken place. The Atlantic has been unusually active with, as of September 18th, twenty-two named storms having taken place so far in 2020 with several more weeks in the hurricane season left to go. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

SEPTEMBER IS PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH!

Prostate cancer has touch my life and, as a result, changed my outlook on life forever. It’s not an ‘old man’s’ disease. Many men in their forties are diagnosed with prostate cancer. For men, it’s the second leading cause of death by cancer. My diagnosis came about as a result of a routine PSA test from my general practitioner. Regardless of your family history, race, ethnic background, socioeconomic status, etc., don’t think it can’t happen to you. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. Make sure you educate yourself as much as possible about this disease. You may save your life or the life of a loved one.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 31 – August 7, 2020 #science #climate #climatechange #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #disasterprep #spacex #nasa #astronomy #mars

Hurricane Katrina approaches the central USA Gulf Coast on 28 August 2005. Satellite image courtesy NOAA.

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is a daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, nine named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at a checklist for assembling an emergency kit and hurricane preparedness…so let’s get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this summer. In the central Pacific, Douglas took a swipe at Hawaii. Hanna made landfall in Texas and Isaias on the USA’s east coast. The Atlantic has been unusually active with nine named storms having taken place by the end of July…and the peak of hurricane season is still ahead. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kits for home and your place of work.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are always an excellent source as well. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

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Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For July 24 – 31, 2020 #science #perseverance #mars #climate #climatechange #weather #meteorology #hurricane #hurricaneprep #disasterprep

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is staying healthy and faring well in the midst of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. As usual, we’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be a continuing daunting challenge and finding a long-term path of human adaptation is far easier said than done. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season has also gotten off to a historic start with, as of this post, eight named storms for the 2020 season. We’ll also take a look at heat safety and a checklist for assembling an emergency kit…so let’s get started.

Looking into the eye of the best. A common feature of a powerful hurricane is a well developed eye. Photo courtesy NOAA/NWS.

HURRICANE PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones in July. In the central Pacific, Douglas took a swipe at Hawaii. The Atlantic has been unusually active. Hanna made landfall in southern Texas. As of this post, Hurricane Isaias is approaching the Southeastern USA coast as it intensifies. Time is running out on preparations that are further made more difficult by the pandemic conditions in Florida and several surrounding states. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For those in regions prone to hurricanes, now is the time to assemble your kit for home and/or your place of work.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for COVID-19, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For May 15 – 22, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #severeweather #tornado #climate #climatechange #environment #pollution #weatherready #coronavirus #covid19 #pandemic #health

Greetings to everyone! I hope everyone out there is faring well in this middle of the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science, our changing climate is proving to be an obstacle in dealing with the pandemic and finding a long-term path of adaptation. We also will have some interesting weeks ahead as many areas are opening up while the pandemic statistics numbers keep increasing with no end in sight. The North American spring severe weather season is in full swing and the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season is just days away. Well take a look at some severe weather safety information and much more with this week’s picks…so let’s get started.

SEVERE WEATHER PREPAREDNESS

What would you consider the leading weather related killer in the USA? It’s not tornadoes, hurricanes, blizzards, or high winds. Flooding, specifically flash flooding, is the leading weather killer and most of these deaths are preventable. Knowing if you live in a flood zone is key. Also being aware of roads that are frequently flooded during heavy rain events is equally important. It takes less than a foot of water to sweep away many vehicles These NOAA infographics have good tips on staying safe in flood conditions.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

Knowing where to get reliable, accurate, and timely weather information can be a daunting task, especially for folks who are new to a region that may be prone to a hurricane risk, winter storms, or episodes of severe weather (large hail, damaging straight line winds, and tornadoes). This infographic from NOAA’s National Weather Service will help you through the murky haze of disinformation. This infographic is valid year round for every kind of weather situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late regarding my prostate cancer treatment. I’m doing well and am further bolstered by your words of encouragement and support. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright Tornado Quest 1998-2020

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Picks For March 6 – 13, 2020 – #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #severeweather #climate #climatechange #environment #weatherready #airquality #health #astronomy

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. The coronavirus is the big story with the USA now under, as of 13 March 2020, a national emergency. Now…let’s get started on this week’s reads.

For our severe weather preparedness tip for this week, let’s touch on two topics…reliable and official sources of weather forecasts, watches, and warnings, and then, the difference between a severe weather watch and warning.

This infographic says it all concisely, clearly, and makes no mistake that you should only follow important severe weather information from trusted weather sources.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

If by chance you are in an area where severe weather is forecast, it’s important to know the difference between a severe thunderstorm or tornado watch and a warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, TX

An emergency kit is also an essential part of severe weather preparedness. This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you get started. Since severe weather and other weather-related disasters can occur year round, it’s an excellent idea to have this at the ready regardless of where you live or the month/season.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received as of late. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. As for the coronavirus, please follow good personal hygiene and prescribed by official sources, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For February 21 – 28, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #cawx #kswx #weatherforecasting #winter #scicomm

Greetings once again to one and all! Plenty of interesting topics to cover this week. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center and will be for many years as humanity grapples with the best path of adaptation. On a more personal note, I appreciate the continued best wishes for recovery and good health during my rehabilitation from prostate cancer surgery. You folks are awesome! Now…let’s get started on this week’s reads.

Map courtesy NOAA

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so am I and I invite you to enjoy me. Once again I’d like to thank so many of you for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. I’m still recovering well from surgery. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For January 10 – 17, 2020 #science #weather #weatherforecasting #climate #climatechange #australia #brushfire #noaa #nasa #snow

Greetings once again to one and all! There’s plenty of topics to cover this week. The Australian brushfires are still a big story. In the coming months, an analysis of this unprecedented event will take place. In atmospheric science news, our changing climate is front and center as we reach, by some accounts, a point of no return. On a more personal note, I appreciate the continued best wishes for a speedy recovery during my rehabilitation from prostate cancer surgery. On that note, let’s get started on this week’s reads.

Graph credits: NASA GISS/Gavin Schmidt
Snowflake image by photographer Alexey Kljatov via TreeHugger

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, so is Tornado Quest. I’d like to thank so many of you again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. As of this post, I’m still recovering well from surgery. Cancer does not have to be an automatic death sentence and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For October 26 – November 2, 2019 #science #climate #weather #climatechange #environment #wildfire #cafire #lightning #movember

Greetings once again to one and all! Here’s a review of my intro from the last three weeks. After a few months on hiatus for health reasons, I’ve decided to resume this weekly blog which contains my personal choices of the top ten science reads from the past week. This post will be published every Saturday between 12:00pm and 3:00pm Central USA Time (1700 UTC to 2000 UTC). The subject matter will be subjective, but catered towards what my followers in social media are interested in and cover topics that I feel are of scientific importance. There will be seasonal emphasis on the severe weather season across North America and the Atlantic hurricane season. During the next few weeks, there will be a few things to be ironed out, so the usual bugs and/or changes are likely to happen. The topics will be from a wide variety of science interests; astronomy, weather and meteorology, climate and climate change, environmental science topics, the occasional quixotic read, and much, much more. On a personal note, I appreciate the many best wishes for a speedy recovery. I am in the middle of a long rehabilitation regime from prostate cancer surgery and to say it is a daunting challenge is an understatement. I have many long months ahead and your kind and caring words mean the world to me. A medical situation such as this certainly has made me take pause and reevaluate the priorities in my life.

On that note, let’s get started and take a look at this week’s reads.

Graphic courtesy NOAA
  • Last but certainly not least, it’s Movember…one month out of the year when men around the globe grow some facial hair in support of conscious raising efforts to bring awareness of specific men’s health issues. For more information, please check out the Movember website!

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, pay me a visit and let us connect. I’d like to thank so many of you again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. As of this post, I’m recovering well from surgery. Cancer does not have to be a automatic death sentence, and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss with your doctor about getting your PSA tested. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers…and Good Luck!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Reads For October 12 – 19, 2019 #science #climate #weather #climatechange #environment #hurricaneprep

Greetings to one and all! Here’s a review of my intro from last week. After a few months on hiatus for health reasons, I’ve decided to resume the weekly blog with a subjective view of the top ten science reads from the past week. This post will be published every Saturday between 12:00pm and 2:00pm Central USA Time (1800 UTC – 200 UTC). As I mentioned, the selection will be subjective, but lean heavily towards what my followers in social media are interested in. There will be seasonal emphasis on the severe weather season across North America and the Atlantic hurricane season. During the next few weeks, there will be a few kinks to be ironed out, so expect a few bugs and/or changes to come along. The topics will be from a wide variety of science interests; astronomy, weather and meteorology, climate and climate change, environmental science topics, the occasional quixotic read, and much, much more. On a more personal note, I appreciate the ‘good vibes’ and wishes for a speedy recovery as I am in the middle of a long rehabilitation regime from prostate cancer surgery. I have a daunting challenge ahead of me and your kind and caring words mean the world to me. A medical situation such as this certainly has made me take pause and reevaluate the priorities in my life.

Without further delay, let’s get started on this week’s links.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross can be very helpful in putting together a disaster preparedness kit.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, pay me a visit and let us connect. A million ‘thank you’ again for all the thoughtful comments I’ve received over the past few weeks. Cancer does not have to be a automatic death sentence, and I have no intention of giving up this fight and will accept nothing but absolute and total victory. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss with your doctor getting tested. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is only one of many reputable sites with further information.

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC