Tornado Quest Top Science Links For May 14 – 21, 2022

Greetings to everyone! I hope this week’s post finds all of you happy, healthy, and doing well. We’ll continue sharing severe weather preparedness information this week with an infographic on tornado sheltering safety. There are many other interesting topics to cover, so let’s get started.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY

A quick review of some important tornado sheltering guidelines.

Infographics courtesy NOAA/NWS

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving, information on winter storm watches, warnings, and other related weather advisories! None of the links on this website should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! Thanks to everyone for stopping by. A big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram, or Facebook, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, stay safe, stay positive, and test negative!

See you next Saturday!

Tornado Quest micro-podcast for May 14 – 21, 2022

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Please note: queries regarding marketing, promotions, sales schemes, prizes, or papers/research that have not been under & approved by scientific peer review will not be accepted.

Copyright © 1998 – 2022 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For August 14 – 21, 2021

Greetings everyone! I hope this week’s post finds everyone doing well. During the past week, drought and damaging wildfires have continue to plague much of western North America. As for the tropical Atlantic, activity had definitely been on the upswing. Hurricane Grace made landfall in Mexico and Hurricane Henri is poised to present a significant threat to the northeastern USA, and Atlantic Canada. We’ve still the most active weeks of the hurricane season ahead. The National Hurricane Center updated the 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclone outlook. An active season is anticipated. A link to the updated outlook is included in this weeks post. We’ll also continue our review of hurricane safety/preparedness and summer heat safety. There are many other good science reads to review for this week, so let’s get started.

Hurricane Henri strengthening off the eastern USA coast on 21 August 2021
Infographic courtesy NOAA

HURRICANE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

The official start of the Atlantic hurricane season began June 1, 2021. As is the case with most years, the late summer and autumn months comes the peak of activity. This is a list of tropical cyclone safety and preparedness links that I hope you’ll find helpful and spearhead your preparedness plan. None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

WEATHER  DATA

National Hurricane Center

Tropical Atlantic

Central Pacific Hurricane Center

National Weather Service Homepage

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Climate Prediction Center

Storm Prediction Center

National Data Buoy Center

NCAR Tropical Cyclone Guidance Project

HURRICANE SAFETY & EDUCATIONAL  INFORMATION

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

The following infographics cover many important topics including emergency kits, staying informed, and avoiding misinformation and disinformation that are applicable to tropical cyclone scenarios. Tornadoes are also common in land-falling tropical storms and hurricanes. If in doubt, always stay with OFFICIAL sources of important information, forecasts, and warnings.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross
Graphic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

QUICK REVIEW OF

SUMMER HEAT SAFETY

Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

Even though this infographic is focused on winter weather, it certainly applies to weather information year round. Diligence from January through December is important to cull through misinformation, disinformation, and unfounded rumors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS Fort Worth, TX

Please keep in mind that ONLY NOAA weather radio, your local National Weather Service office, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving information on hurricane/tropical storm watches, warnings, and other related warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’d like a detailed review of tornado and severe weather safety, please review April and May posts. Next week we’ll continue information on hurricane preparedness and summer heat safety. I’d like to extend a big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, get vaccinated, sport a spiffy mask, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

See you next Saturday!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Please note: queries regarding marketing, promotions, sales schemes, prizes, or papers/research that have not been under & approved by scientific peer review WILL NOT be accepted.

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Science Links For August 7 -14, 2021

Greetings everyone! I hope this week’s post finds you health, happy, and the weather is to your liking. The big news this week is the IPCC’s climate report. The full report is in this week’s post. During the past week, drought and damaging wildfires have plagued much of western North America and eastern Europe. In the tropical Atlantic activity has increased in recent days. We’ve still the most active weeks of the hurricane season ahead. The National Hurricane Center updated the 2021 Atlantic tropical cyclone outlook. An active season is anticipated. A link to the updated outlook is included in this weeks post. We’ll also continue our review of hurricane safety/preparedness and summer heat safety. There are many other good science reads to review for this week, so let’s get started.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

QUICK REVIEW OF SUMMER HEAT SAFETY

In light of the ongoing North American heat wave, here are some very helpful infographics on heat safety that could save someone’s life.

Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

HURRICANE SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

The official start of the Atlantic hurricane season began June 1, 2021. As is the case with most years, the late summer and autumn months comes the peak of activity. This is a list of tropical cyclone safety and preparedness links that I hope you’ll find helpful and spearhead your preparedness plan. None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

WEATHER  DATA

National Hurricane Center

Tropical Atlantic

Central Pacific Hurricane Center

National Weather Service Homepage

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Climate Prediction Center

Storm Prediction Center

National Data Buoy Center

NCAR Tropical Cyclone Guidance Project

HURRICANE SAFETY & EDUCATIONAL  INFORMATION

NOAA Hurricane Preparedness

CDC Hurricane Preparedness

American Red Cross

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

American Red Cross Hurricane Safety Checklist (PDF file)

Extensive FEMA Emergency Preparedness Document (34 Page PDF File)

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

The following infographics cover many important topics including emergency kits, staying informed, and avoiding misinformation and disinformation that are applicable to tropical cyclone scenarios. Tornadoes are also common in land-falling tropical storms and hurricanes. If in doubt, always stay with OFFICIAL sources of important information, forecasts, and warnings.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross
Graphic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

Even though this infographic is focused on winter weather, it certainly applies to weather information year round. Diligence from January through December is important to cull through misinformation, disinformation, and unfounded rumors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS Fort Worth, TX

Please keep in mind that ONLY NOAA weather radio, your local National Weather Service office, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving information on hurricane/tropical storm watches, warnings, and other related warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! If you’d like a detailed review of tornado and severe weather safety, please review April and May posts. Next week we’ll continue information on hurricane preparedness and summer heat safety. I’d like to extend a big ‘Thank You’ to my followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Tumblr, or Instagram, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, get vaccinated, sport a spiffy mask, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

See you next Saturday!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Please note: queries regarding marketing, promotions, sales schemes, prizes, or papers/research that have not been under & approved by scientific peer review WILL NOT be accepted.

Copyright © 1998 – 2021 Tornado Quest, LLC

TORNADO QUEST TOP TEN SCIENCE LINKS FOR NOVEMBER 27 – DECEMBER 4, 2020

#science #weather #meteorology #weathersafety #wintersafety #climate #climatechange #drought #environment #pollution #astronomy #scicomm #criticalthinking

After many harrowing months during and exceptionally hazardous and stressful year, the Atlantic hurricane season has officially come to and end. We’ll take a quick look back at a record setting year the few will forget anytime soon. With the changing of the seasons in the northern hemisphere, attention will shift to winter weather safety. We’ll touch on that topic with plenty of information for the next several weeks. There are many other good stories to cover, so lets get started.

Graphic courtesy NOAA
  • Last but not least, let’s take a look back at the 2020 Atlantic hurricane season by the numbers and a review of the events on a map of the Atlantic basin. By all respects, it was a remarkable year that won’t soon be forgotten. More details from NOAA: “Record-breaking Atlantic hurricane season draws to an end.
Infographic courtesy NOAA
Graphic courtesy NWS/National Hurricane Center

WINTER WEATHER SAFETY AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season will officially end on 30 November 2020. This year will go down in the record books for having many elements of an extraordinary year. Now, across much of the northern hemisphere, attention turns to winter weather hazards. The same preparedness plans and supplies that are helpful for tropical cyclones are beneficial to have for winter weather. NOAA has a very nice Winter Weather Safety website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and information you may need.

This NOAA winter weather page has a myriad of links beneficial to organizations such as public services, schools, organizations, etc.

NOAA also has an excellent printable publication that covers winter weather safety which is one of the most underrated weather hazards. (12 page PDF file)

The handy checklist below from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. A kit like this is very helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes and hurricanes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

Misinformation and disinformation is running rampant across social media platforms of all kinds as of late. I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Here’s an excellent and concise video on spotting misinformation you might see online. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, sport a spiffy mask as often as you can, practice good hand-washing hygiene, mind your social distancing, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For September 25 – October 2, 2020 #science #weather #meteorology #tornado #hurricane #hurricaneprep #hurricanesafety #disasterprep #climate #climatechange #environment #astronomy #prostatecancer

A visible satellite view of the busiest segment of the 2020 eastern Pacific and Atlantic tropical cyclone season.

The wildfires in California are, as of this post, showing no signs of letting up. In the meantime, the Atlantic tropical cyclone season is much quieter, but many more weeks remain. As usual, there are several good stories to cover this week including a good read on a shift in tornado occurrence patterns, so lets get started.

HURRICANE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS

The Atlantic and central Pacific have become quite active with several tropical cyclones this year. In the central and eastern Pacific, several named storms have taken place. The Atlantic has been unusually active with, as of September 18th, twenty-two named storms having taken place so far in 2020 with several more weeks in the hurricane season left to go. NOAA has a great website to help you get ready with plenty of helpful tips and infographics to help you get the supplies you may need.

This handy checklist from the American Red Cross will help you put together an emergency kit for a variety of weather scenarios. For folks living in regions prone to hurricanes, it’s not too late to assemble your kits for home and your place of work. A kit like this can also be helpful in a variety of other difficult scenarios from wildfires to blizzards to tornadoes.

Graphic courtesy American Red Cross

I would be remiss to not remind folks to stick with trusted and reliable sources for your weather information. A NOAA weather radio is essential and should be as common in homes and workplaces as smoke detectors…regardless of where you live in the USA and its territories. Of course, broadcast meteorologists of your choice are often equipped with sources of important information that is specific to your locale. Bottom line: use discretion very carefully and avoid hypesters, shills, and attention-seekers at all cost…and think before you click.

Graphic courtesy NOAA/NWS

SEPTEMBER IS PROSTATE CANCER AWARENESS MONTH!

September may have come to an end, but that doesn’t mean an end to the need for prostate cancer awareness. Prostate cancer has touch my life and, as a result, changed my outlook on life forever. It’s not an ‘old man’s’ disease. Many men in their forties are diagnosed with prostate cancer. For men, it’s the second leading cause of death by cancer. My diagnosis came about as a result of a routine PSA test from my general practitioner. Regardless of your family history, race, ethnic background, socioeconomic status, etc., don’t think it can’t happen to you. If you’re a male over the age of 40, you should discuss getting your PSA tested with your doctor. The Prostate Cancer Foundation is an excellent website with further information. Make sure you educate yourself as much as possible about this disease. You may save your life or the life of a loved one.

That’s a wrap for this post! I’d like to extend a warm welcome to my new followers in social media. I’m glad you’re along for the fun! If you’re on Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, let’s connect! As for the COVID-19 pandemic, please stay home if possible, practice good personal hygiene, mind your social distancing, sport a spiffy mask, stay safe, and stay healthy!

Cheers…Stay Healthy…and Good Luck!

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2020 Tornado Quest, LLC

The Heat Index: What Your Body Thinks The Temperature Is On Warm & Hot Days. #heat #heatwave #heatindex #summersafety #heatsafety

This chart shows you the Heat Index…which is the temperature your body is reacting to regardless of the actual air temperature. Obviously the drier the air, the easier it is on your body to handle the heat. Depending on your physical condition & level of hydration, the indices in the white range can be tolerated well if you pace yourself. The beige, yellow, orange, and red indices are where even the most physically fit and well hydrated people can get into trouble very, very fast. If you’re in doubt, pace yourself, stay very well hydrated, and don’t forget the sunscreen. Those UV rays will wreck havoc on your skin.

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For June 22 – 29, 2019

Greetings to one and all. If it’s summer in your location, I hope the heat isn’t getting ridiculous. Much of Europe is in the midst of a lethal heatwave that will likely happen more often and with steady intensity.

  1. If you’re an urban dweller and have a feeling that city life is hotter during the summer than rural locations, you’re not imagining things. The urban heat island effect is a very real weather phenomenon.
  2. Speaking of heat, as of this post, much of continental Europe is broiling in temperatures of 104°F (40°C) or higher! In fact, France had their highest recorded temperature of 114.6F (45.9C) which broke a record that was set during a very deadly 2003 heatwave.
  3. Disaster prevention is a tricky business, especially when it comes to weather events. By some standards, investment that will help reduce damage from floods and winds is money well spent.
  4. Over 70 public health and medical organizations are calling for badly needed action on climate change.
  5. Demand For Electricity To Climb As World Gets Hotter.” Most of the tropics, as well as southern Europe, China, & the US, are likely to experience the highest increases.
  6. An excellent essay by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on why communicating science to the general public is so important and why that communication needs to be carefully crafted to a fine art.
  7. Confusing process with content…& the failure to comprehend or objectively assess scientific data. “Red State Vs. Blue State: Climate Action Splits America.”
  8. Yet another example of the irrevocable connection between air quality and public health. “Exposure to air pollution seems to negatively affect women’s fertility.”
  9. Our planet is often thought of as several separate entities with no connecting links. Nothing could be further from the truth. Whether it is the atmosphere or the deepest part of the oceans, all are linked in an unbreakable bond.
  10. Last but not least, a very thought provoking “must read” with exceptionally unique & profound viewpoints. “Life in space: Stories from 50 astronauts in their own words.

Hurricane Preparedness

The beginning of June brings the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season. For the next few weeks, I’ll share some informative links pertaining to this threat that, like many other weather hazards across North America, occurs annually. Some years are relatively quiet, some not so. The important fact to remember is that it only takes one tropical storm or hurricane to affect the lives of millions. Unlike tornadoes, tropical cyclones can be forecast days in advance which, for those in its path, is fortunate since it gives them plentiful time to prepare and evacuate. These are links pertaining to tropical cyclones (tropical storms & hurricanes) that I hope you’ll find helpful.

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

Cheers!

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Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC