Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For June 22 – 29, 2019

Greetings to one and all. If it’s summer in your location, I hope the heat isn’t getting ridiculous. Much of Europe is in the midst of a lethal heatwave that will likely happen more often and with steady intensity.

  1. If you’re an urban dweller and have a feeling that city life is hotter during the summer than rural locations, you’re not imagining things. The urban heat island effect is a very real weather phenomenon.
  2. Speaking of heat, as of this post, much of continental Europe is broiling in temperatures of 104°F (40°C) or higher! In fact, France had their highest recorded temperature of 114.6F (45.9C) which broke a record that was set during a very deadly 2003 heatwave.
  3. Disaster prevention is a tricky business, especially when it comes to weather events. By some standards, investment that will help reduce damage from floods and winds is money well spent.
  4. Over 70 public health and medical organizations are calling for badly needed action on climate change.
  5. Demand For Electricity To Climb As World Gets Hotter.” Most of the tropics, as well as southern Europe, China, & the US, are likely to experience the highest increases.
  6. An excellent essay by Dr. Marshall Shepherd on why communicating science to the general public is so important and why that communication needs to be carefully crafted to a fine art.
  7. Confusing process with content…& the failure to comprehend or objectively assess scientific data. “Red State Vs. Blue State: Climate Action Splits America.”
  8. Yet another example of the irrevocable connection between air quality and public health. “Exposure to air pollution seems to negatively affect women’s fertility.”
  9. Our planet is often thought of as several separate entities with no connecting links. Nothing could be further from the truth. Whether it is the atmosphere or the deepest part of the oceans, all are linked in an unbreakable bond.
  10. Last but not least, a very thought provoking “must read” with exceptionally unique & profound viewpoints. “Life in space: Stories from 50 astronauts in their own words.

Hurricane Preparedness

The beginning of June brings the official start of the Atlantic hurricane season. For the next few weeks, I’ll share some informative links pertaining to this threat that, like many other weather hazards across North America, occurs annually. Some years are relatively quiet, some not so. The important fact to remember is that it only takes one tropical storm or hurricane to affect the lives of millions. Unlike tornadoes, tropical cyclones can be forecast days in advance which, for those in its path, is fortunate since it gives them plentiful time to prepare and evacuate. These are links pertaining to tropical cyclones (tropical storms & hurricanes) that I hope you’ll find helpful.

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For June 15 – 22, 2019

Greetings and Happy Summer Solstice to my followers and friends in the Northern Hemisphere! Happy winter for those south of the equator! An active severe weather period has been in place across much of North America for the past few days. By the end of 2019, there will be many records set. Speaking of records, we have several links concerning climate records that are being broken globally. Plenty of other topics to cover, so let’s get started.

  1. For research meteorologists, studying tornadoes in the field is a dauntless and dangerous pursuit. Here’s a very unique way of studying that information. “This beastly tornado left behind captivating images and an incredible set of data.”
  2. With each passing year, heat records continue to be broken on a global scale. At the current rate of warming, over half of the globe will have set records by the end of the 21st century.
  3. Consensus on any topic when a panel of experts is involved is challenging. In this case, there was a variety of opinions, but the same general agreement.
  4. There’s a lot in a name. Sometimes changing that name or term can be little more than confusing process over content. In this case and whilst going by scientific data, a name change wouldn’t be out of the question. “Is it time to retire ‘climate change’ for ‘climate crisis’?”
  5. The USA’s EPA just changed their game when it comes to climate change…and it doesn’t look good by any measure.
  6. An interesting read on the many facets of the economy that are affected by climate change.
  7. Teaching our children about climate change can be very challenging. Here’s one schools solution to the problem.
  8. This is truly an astounding image and an impressive astronomical achievement. “OSIRIS-REx spacecraft captures closest ever image of asteroid Bennu.”
  9. For folks in the Northern Hemisphere, the summer solstice has arrived. We are aware of how these long hours of daylight affect us, but how does it affect wildlife?
  10. The 2019 Atlantic hurricane season has arrived…and it’s time to prepare for the storm you hope never gives you a visit.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

Testing your NOAA weather radio year round is one of the best ways to stay informed on weather conditions for your area regardless of the season. Many National Weather Service offices conduct weekly tests. It’s also a good idea to replace the batteries in your NOAA weather radio when you change batteries in your smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, Texas
Infographic courtesy NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued and you are in the warned area, there are good options and bad options for taking shelter. The choice can sometimes be a life-and-death decision. Bad options have killed countless people in recent years. One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

Flash flooding is the number one killer related to severe thunderstorms. Here are some very important flash flood safety tips to remember.

Infographic courtesy NOAA
Infographic courtesy NOAA

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! Next week, I’ll include some summer safety infographics along with hurricane preparedness information. To my new followers out there, I’d like to extend a very sincere “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, your loyalty is deeply appreciated. Thanks so much for the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For June 8 – 15, 2019

Greetings to one and all! We’ve a plethora of topics to cover this week including hurricane preparation tips, so let’s get started.

  1. On the current path to climate change, large USA cities will be dealing with the daunting and potentially deadly aspects of heat waves.
  2. Since the middle of the 18th century, humans have been responsible for the extinction of almost 600 plant species.
  3. Will the risk of conflict between countries increase in a warming world? “How 11 experts spent 2 days trying to find consensus on climate and conflict.”
  4. Many of us are well aware of the devastating effects of drought. Here’s a sobering read on what may be in store for much of the planet in the years to come. “Creeping Toward Permanent Drought.”
  5. An exceptionally disconcerting read. “Temperatures leap 40 degrees above normal as the Arctic Ocean and Greenland ice sheet see record June melting.”
  6. At the other end of the precipitation spectrum, recent droughts across many USA states have been exceptionally devastating and records have been broken in several locations. Why is so much of the USA experiencing flooding right now?
  7. The dangers of mosquitoes are highly underrated and very common. People freak out about sharks, snakes, lions, tigers, and bears, etc…but none can come close to the lethal dangers of the mosquito. As our climate changes and warms, there’s a high likelihood that the potentially lethal Dengue Disease will spread across parts of the USA with the southern states being the most vulnerable.
  8. Here’s a very cool astronomy read. “Perfect Example of a Barred Spiral Galaxy, Seen Face On. This is What Our Milky Way Might Look Like.
  9. This should come as no surprise. Just a couple of hours spent outdoors weekly is good for your health. Don’t forget to look up and admire the clouds!
  10. Last but not least, the arrival of June brings the official beginning of the Atlantic hurricane season. Here’s an excellent site that is a great starting point to help you prepare for the storm you hope never happens.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

Testing your NOAA weather radio year round is one of the best ways to stay informed on weather conditions for your area regardless of the season. Many National Weather Service offices conduct weekly tests. It’s also a good idea to replace the batteries in your NOAA weather radio when you change batteries in your smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is outlook-category-descriptions.png
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, Texas
Infographic courtesy NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is know-where-to-go-when-sheltering-from-a-tornado.jpg
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is where-is-your-tornado-safe-place.jpg
Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued and you are in the warned area, there are good options and bad options for taking shelter. The choice can sometimes be a life-and-death decision. Bad options have killed countless people in recent years. One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is tornado-sheltering-guidelines-1.jpg
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is bridges-and-overpasses-not-tornado-or-hail-shelters.jpg
Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

Flash flooding is the number one killer related to severe thunderstorms. Here are some very important flash flood safety tips to remember.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Perhaps the factor that leads to more flash flood deaths than anything else is underestimating the power of water.

Infographic courtesy NOAA

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is red-cross-emergency-preparedness-checklist.jpg
Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very sincere “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, your loyalty is deeply appreciated. Thanks so much for the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For June 1 – 8, 2019

Greetings everyone! It’s been an active week across much of North America with flooding, severe weather, and summer heat affecting many areas. May 2019 will go in the record books for tornado activity and flooding across several states. The beginning of June also brings the start of the Atlantic hurricane season. There are plenty of other topics to cover and severe weather preparedness tips, so let’s get started.

  1. May 2019 will go in the weather history books as a record month for tornado activity across the USA. Here’s a detailed look back with a plethora of fascinating data.
  2. Ongoing floods in the USA’s Great Plains are not just affecting homeowners. “Midwest farmers take to Twitter to document flood disaster.”
  3. As floods have devastated the Great Plains, heat waves have been taking place in much of the southeastern USA. This is one of many clear signals of how important urgent climate action is. Since the 1960s, U.S. cities have experienced more frequent and longer periods of extreme heat…and the death toll from this heat has been rising.
  4. The official beginning of the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season commenced on June 1st. Let’s revisit this years Atlantic hurricane outlook from NOAA.
  5. With the arrival of the Atlantic hurricane season, here’s a primer on hurricane preparedness from NOAA with several links to other information sources.
  6. Microplastic have proven to be problematic world-wide and have been discovered in some very remote areas. Some say it’s time for producers of this particular type of plastic pollution to be held accountable.
  7. Recycling is an exceptionally important part of taking care of our planet. Often it can be a confusing task. As it becomes more of a widespread practice, some folks are developing ways to make it easier for you and me.
  8. Communication style is key in coming to a consensus or when conversing with skeptics. As many of us know, conversation with a climate change skeptic/denialist is often like talking to a brick wall. So how do you talk with such a person?
  9. Speaking of climate change denialism, this story has given them plenty of fodder to get their dander up in recent days. But is there any validation to the headline?
  10. The usual trend seen in observing the universe is to note how galaxies are expanding and moving away from our own Milky Way galaxy. Here’s an interesting read on one galaxy that’s moving towards us.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

Testing your NOAA weather radio year round is one of the best ways to stay informed on weather conditions for your area regardless of the season. Many National Weather Service offices conduct weekly tests. It’s also a good idea to replace the batteries in your NOAA weather radio when you change batteries in your smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, Texas
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued and you are in the warned area, there are good options and bad options for taking shelter. The choice can sometimes be a life-and-death decision. Bad options have killed countless people in recent years. One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very sincere “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, your loyalty is deeply appreciated. Thanks so much for the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC

Tornado Quest Top Ten Science Links For May 25 – June 1, 2019

Greetings to everyone and Happy Meteorological Summer to my followers and friends in the Northern Hemisphere! It’s also the official first day of the Atlantic hurricane season. May was a wild weather month for much of the Great Plains in the USA with substantial numbers of tornadoes and record breaking floods across much of the Arkansas River basin. Many more topics to cover this week, so let’s get started.

  1. The planet Mars is a very dusty location with our amazing rovers getting a thorough covering of Martian dust in short order. Fortunately, there’s a solution.
  2. An amazing discover that gives us a look back in time. “This Seawater Is 20,000 Years Old, and Has Remained Untouched Since the Last Ice Age.”
  3. Wildfires can devastate areas that are full of homes, businesses, and other populated areas. When looked at from a nature perspective, they truly are a very normal part of how our planet operates.
  4. I’d like to this this was in jest, but it’s not. Apparently, changing a name makes all the difference in the world. Not.
  5. This gives new meaning to the phrase, “cooking the books.” “E.P.A. Plans to Get Thousands of Pollution Deaths Off the Books by Changing Its Math.”
  6. In recent years, climate discussions have rarely centered around the Earth’s ozone layer. New studies have begun to focus on this very important part of our planet’s atmosphere.
  7. As a climate researcher, should I change my air-travel habits?” Personally speaking, I wouldn’t and feel this is a subject that many are taking far too seriously.
  8. These ideas should be implemented in other USA states as well. “Louisiana has a new plan to prevent flood disasters.”
  9. Recent global weather patterns have led to the above average number of tornadoes across much of the USA’s Great Plains. Here’s a concise read on why this happened.
  10. Here’s a more detailed look at the May 2019 tornado activity across the USA. This month is certainly going to be one for the record books.

SEVERE WEATHER SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS

Here are some links and infographics that will provide a starting point for gathering online severe weather information. I hope you find plentiful information here that will help you become better prepared as we navigate one of the most volatile climactic seasons on our planet.

Testing your NOAA weather radio year round is one of the best ways to stay informed on weather conditions for your area regardless of the season. Many National Weather Service offices conduct weekly tests. It’s also a good idea to replace the batteries in your NOAA weather radio when you change batteries in your smoke/carbon monoxide detectors.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is forecast, it is assigned a risk category. Hazards exist in all categories, hence it’s important to be aware of all of them. Note: tornadoes can and do occur even in Marginal Risk areas…and a Slight Risk does not mean that storms will be “slightly” severe.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

After thunderstorms form, they are carefully observed with Doppler Radar. This infographic explains how this amazing technology works and how its progressed over the years.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

When severe weather is anticipated, a Severe Thunderstorm or Tornado Watch will be issued. It’s very important to know the difference between a Watch and a Warning.

Infographic courtesy NWS Amarillo, Texas
Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued, it means you need to take cover immediately. Where you take cover can sometimes be a life-or-death situation.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS
Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

If a TORNADO WARNING is issued and you are in the warned area, there are good options and bad options for taking shelter. The choice can sometimes be a life-and-death decision. Bad options have killed countless people in recent years. One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NOAA/NWS

One of the most onerous and dangerous behaviors during severe weather is the practice of “sheltering’ under an overpass. Under no circumstances should anyone engage in this life-threatening activity.

Infographic courtesy NWS Norman, OK

Here are more links that will help you prepare and stay informed during the severe weather season.

National Weather Service Homepage

Storm Prediction Center

National Weather Service Weather Prediction Center

NOAA Weather Radio

Interactive NOAA Weather Radio Coverage Map

Sky Watcher Cloud Chart: An excellent 2 page PDF file from NOAA and NASA on cloud types and and information on how clouds form.

Tornadoes, Lightning, & Thunderstorms: Nature’s Most Violent Storms (PDF file)

Tornado Safety Rules from the Storm Prediction Center

Highway Overpasses As Tornado Shelters (Slide Presentation)

The Online Tornado FAQ

Facts About Derechos

American Red Cross Severe Weather Safety Information

Flash Flooding: Turn Around, Don’t Drown

Preparing Your Pets For Disasters And Emergencies

Ready.gov Basic Disaster Supply Kit Info

This excellent Emergency Kit checklist from the American Red Cross is very helpful in assisting you while you compile items for your kit. A kit like this should be available year round…there are many winter weather scenarios where the same items will come in handy.

Infographic courtesy American Red Cross

Please keep in mind that ONLY your local National Weather Service office, NOAA Weather Radio, or reliable broadcast media are the BEST sources of important, timely, and potentially life-saving weather information, watches, and warnings! None of the links on this page should be used for life-&-death decisions or the protection of property!

That’s a wrap for this post! To my new followers, I’d like to extend a very sincere “Welcome” and thank you for being a part of the fun. For my long-time followers, your loyalty is deeply appreciated. Thanks so much for the support and kind words!

Cheers!

Tornado Quest on Twitter: https://twitter.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Instagram: https://instagram.com/tornadoquest

Tornado Quest on Tumblr: http://tornadoquest.tumblr.com

Tornado Quest on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/tornadoquest

Media inquiries: tornadoquest@protonmail.ch

Copyright © 1998 – 2019 Tornado Quest, LLC